Members’ Interests update September 2012

Sep 13, 2012 by

We’ve just updated our Members’ Interests pages and included:

  • Edward Jones in Delegate, New South Wales
  • Thomas Napier in Ballarat, Victoria
  • James Keith in the Bega district, New South Wales
  • Thomas Edlington in Gippsland, Victoria
  • Samuel Cumming in Gippsland, Victoria

This gives us a chance to remind members that forms are on the website or in the Research Room.

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Historypin

Jul 28, 2012 by

I got up this morning and looked out the window to a day that looked a little damp but was still filled with the promise of completing those jobs, of getting things done. But then I found Historypin and now I can’t even remember what those inconsequential plans were for today!

Do you ever find something really good and wonder if you’re the only person who didn’t know about it? That’s how I feel right now. I’m thinking to myself, if this thing is so good, how come I haven’t come across it before now? So, honestly, I’ve decided that as we’re now into our second day of National Family History Week, it’s my solemn duty to fully investigate this potential new avenue for family historians and post about it so that others may find it too. Well, that’s my excuse for not getting anything else done this morning and I’m sticking to it!

So what is Historypin exactly? Well, it’s an interactive map of the world that people and organisations are pinning pictures and audio and video files to. You can search for a particular place or you can browse, and that’s probably where you’ll get into trouble. I started looking at a picture of people dressed in fancy dress in 1908 in a  Koo Wee Rup farmyard, hopped over to Berwick and looked at the last plane to leave Casey Airfield in 1994, detoured to St. Arnaud c1895 to two men digging a dam with a woman watching in the background. After I while I ended up at Clifton’s Shop c1890s in High Street, West Bromich, took a quick trip to see the John Heath monument in St Giles’ Church in Durham and headed for Main Street, Cowie (near Bannockburn) in the early 1900s.

And I’ve got to tell the truth and say that that’s not all, as a song once said “I’ve been everywhere man” and I’m exhausted!

This short video from Youtube explains it (sort of) in 90 seconds. Click on the arrow to make it play.

More is written about Historypin on the Bright Ideas blog, their guide to Historypin is well worth a look.

But, you will just have to be brave and jump right in – Historypin – if we don’t hear from you in a couple of days we’ll send out a search party.

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Certificate costs increase for Victoria

Jun 26, 2012 by

So, what were you planning to do between now and Sunday? We’d suggest that if you’ve been thinking about getting some uncertified historical birth, death or marriage certificates on line that you swing into action and do it now! Fees are increasing on Sunday and each one will cost you $20 instead of $17.50.

The new fee schedule for Victorian Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages can be seen here:

Thanks to Di Christensen for alerting us to the cost increases.

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Trove and The Geelong Advertiser

Jan 10, 2012 by

Anyone with family history interests in the Geelong area knows (or should know) Suzie Zada’s name and be familiar with her website and blog. Yesterday’s blog post was in her words ‘a bit of a rant’ about why the Geelong Advertiser is not included in Trove. And it’s a darn good question. One worth thinking about really, it just hadn’t occurred to me that it wasn’t there.

I guess another good question is why we’ve not got a link to Suzie’s blog on our website – that’s one I can fix!

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Crime in the Port Phillip District 1835-51

Aug 26, 2011 by

Every now and then I like to while away a few minutes just ‘looking’ at a library catalogue, you can have a lot of fun mixing and matching search terms to see what you get and it was during one of these kinds of lucky dip search sessions with the Casey Cardinia Library Catalogue that I found Crime in the Port Phillip District 1835-51 by Paul R Mullaly. The catalogue summary said that it’s: “a study of the administration of the criminal law in the Port Phillip District from the arrival of the white settlers until the onset of the Gold Rush and Separation. This study will help the present community understand many aspects of our present culture and give many citizens an insight into the community in which their ancestors lived. This book will be of interest to the legal profession, students of Victorian/Australian history, and a general readership.” And it is – but it’s also so much more, especially if you’re a family historian with ancestors in that place at that time.

The book won the Judges Special Prize for Excellence in the Victorian Community History Awards 2009, and deservedly so. Paul Mullaly QC BA LLB, is obviously a clever man, the letters after his name tell us so, but don’t let that put you off. Paul Mullaly is clever enough to write about a complex topic in plain everyday English that is a pleasure and delight to read. I can understand his meaning and intent on the first reading of every paragraph and so will you.

If you had ancestors in the Port Phillip area between 1835-1851 then you must take a look at the name and subject indexes for the book, which are not at the back of the book but on the publisher’s website as pdf. files to download. So, you can always have the indexes to refer to without having to get the actual book. A little different I’ll admit but the book is 764 pages without indexes and the name index is another 68 pages, so you can see where they’re going with this, if the indexes were printed in the book you might not be able to carry it home!

Crime in the Port Phillip District 1835-51 contains a glossary, a conversion table for money and weights and a background to the community of the time and the emerging legal system and procedures for crime investigation and arrest, committal for trial, preparation for trial and the trial itself. Following that are sections devoted to the the insane, offences against the person, offences against property, offences against justice and miscellaneous offences – all explained in plain language and illustrated with actual cases and names of the people involved. And if worst comes to worst and your ancestors aren’t mentioned in the book but they did have troubles with the law in some way, the background information alone would warrant getting the book.

Sadly, I could find none of my lot, but that didn’t diminish the pleasure I found in reading about someone else’s ancestors, perhaps they were yours! The book is available from the Casey Cardinia Library Corporation, or it will be as soon as I return it – or you could try Trove to see if you’re near the other 20 libraries that hold the book.

 

 

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