National Archives of Ireland Genealogy website

Nov 11, 2012 by

shamrockThe National Archives of Ireland has a brand new genealogy website, only launched a few days ago and the doorway to the:

  • Census Records for 1901
  • Census Records for 1911
  • Tithe Applotment Books from 1823 to 1837
  • Soldiers’ Wills from 1914 to 1917.
Searchable databases and linked images of relevant pages provide free access to the records and there are plans to add more over time. And most importantly, it all looks pretty simple to understand and navigate so Congratulations to the National Archives of Ireland for providing free and easy access to these resources and thanks to Di for alerting us to the website’s launch.

 

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Members’ Interests update September 2012

Sep 13, 2012 by

We’ve just updated our Members’ Interests pages and included:

  • Edward Jones in Delegate, New South Wales
  • Thomas Napier in Ballarat, Victoria
  • James Keith in the Bega district, New South Wales
  • Thomas Edlington in Gippsland, Victoria
  • Samuel Cumming in Gippsland, Victoria

This gives us a chance to remind members that forms are on the website or in the Research Room.

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1911 England and Wales Census Collection

Aug 15, 2012 by

One of our vigilant members has just alerted us to the fact that Ancestry.co.uk are offering free access to the 1911 England and Wales Census Collection from now until November.

From their site: “The 1911 Census of England, Wales, Channel Islands and Isle of Man was taken on the night of 2/3 April. It collected detailed information on the people who spent the night in each household, including their names, marital statuses, ages, occupations and birthplaces.”

So don’t miss this opportunity, registration is required.

 

 

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Historypin

Jul 28, 2012 by

I got up this morning and looked out the window to a day that looked a little damp but was still filled with the promise of completing those jobs, of getting things done. But then I found Historypin and now I can’t even remember what those inconsequential plans were for today!

Do you ever find something really good and wonder if you’re the only person who didn’t know about it? That’s how I feel right now. I’m thinking to myself, if this thing is so good, how come I haven’t come across it before now? So, honestly, I’ve decided that as we’re now into our second day of National Family History Week, it’s my solemn duty to fully investigate this potential new avenue for family historians and post about it so that others may find it too. Well, that’s my excuse for not getting anything else done this morning and I’m sticking to it!

So what is Historypin exactly? Well, it’s an interactive map of the world that people and organisations are pinning pictures and audio and video files to. You can search for a particular place or you can browse, and that’s probably where you’ll get into trouble. I started looking at a picture of people dressed in fancy dress in 1908 in a  Koo Wee Rup farmyard, hopped over to Berwick and looked at the last plane to leave Casey Airfield in 1994, detoured to St. Arnaud c1895 to two men digging a dam with a woman watching in the background. After I while I ended up at Clifton’s Shop c1890s in High Street, West Bromich, took a quick trip to see the John Heath monument in St Giles’ Church in Durham and headed for Main Street, Cowie (near Bannockburn) in the early 1900s.

And I’ve got to tell the truth and say that that’s not all, as a song once said “I’ve been everywhere man” and I’m exhausted!

This short video from Youtube explains it (sort of) in 90 seconds. Click on the arrow to make it play.

More is written about Historypin on the Bright Ideas blog, their guide to Historypin is well worth a look.

But, you will just have to be brave and jump right in – Historypin – if we don’t hear from you in a couple of days we’ll send out a search party.

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Shropshire births, marriages and deaths

Dec 10, 2011 by

Excellent news for those researching family in Shropshire! Shropshire BMD has just come online as part of the UK BMD sites. Now before you get too excited, the site came online on the 9th December and has just over 25,000 marriage records – no births or deaths yet.

While you’re there you can check out the other sites associated with UK BMD, 2,197 in fact, providing links to web sites with transcriptions of UK births, deaths, marriages and censuses plus a few parish records, wills and monumental inscriptions here and there for good measure.

 

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There’s a Parishmouse in the house.

Jul 20, 2011 by

Thanks to the English Black Country List at Roostweb I’ve just discovered Parishmouse and I must say, I’ve unselfishly torn myself away from it to write this post!

If you’ve got research interests in England and Wales then you’ve got to take a look at Parishmouse.The site contains free transcriptions of historical books and parish registers from England and Wales. The site is worth a visit for the large collection of photos alone, with photos of churches and graves and illustrations taken from old books.

There’s a lot of information here, the site is searchable and items are listed by County too making it fairly easy to find something of interest. If you’re looking down the list of categories be sure to click on the link to see all the entries, they’re not all necessarily listed on the front page, the little number in the brackets tell you how many posts (like this one) there are. Clicking on the photo thumbnails will bring up a bigger sized picture. The site is a bit slow tonight, perhaps it’s always like this, I’m not sure.

The author wishes to remain anonymous – there is no information about who is doing such a wonderful job. Shame really, so we’re giving them a plug here. And now that I’ve done that, I’m going back to take a look at the Jewellery Quarter of Birmingham.

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